Back From Wintering

Almost A Full House 

The temperature is still seesawing, but most of the migrating birds have reached us on their usual schedule.  The Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) have finally settled in one of the bird boxes and have started building their nest despite harassment from the House sparrows.  We really have to keep an eye on this one to make sure that the sparrows don’t rout them.

A pair of Tree Swallows settling down

The Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) came back as soon as the flowering fruit trees like cherry and pear here blossomed.  One of them was waiting patiently at the feeder station for the welcome mat.  We promptly cut a few oranges and put them on a tray for them.  It didn’t take them long to dive in for the juice, they must be hungry from their long flight.

Male Baltimore Oriole
Enjoying the welcome mat of fresh Tangerines which is what we had on hand when they  arrived.

Gray Catbirds, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and Chipping sparrows are also here.  The first two still play hide and seek with us; every time we took the cameras out they flew off.  The Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina), the smallest sparrow around here, are not camera shy.  The Ruby-throated Hummingbird haven’t reached here yet.  Only the Bleeding heart flowers have start to bud and the Columbine still have a long way to go.  We use the blooming of these flowers as an indication of the arrival of the Hummingbirds.  The Columbine is a more reliable reference.

Chipping Sparrow and Goldfinch share a feeder

In the mean time, the resident Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia sialis) took no time in starting their family.  So far she has laid five eggs and any day now we’ll will see the first chick.

Eastern Bluebird family. She’s back with building material.
Five beautiful blue eggs of the Bluebird family.

The Black-capped Chickadees (Parus atricapillus)  have almost completed their nest construction.  It looks very comfortable with moss and a fine hair lining.  It will be a couple of days before we see the first egg.

Chickadee nest: lining the bottom with moss and the top with fine hair

We are only missing the Ruby-throated Hummingbird but they should reach our garden soon.  A flight from down south on their tiny wings takes a little longer than the others.

 

Migrating Birds

They Are Back

Around this time in spring we prepare a welcome mat for the migrating birds, both the ones that come to stay for a season or just passing through.  We clean the birdhouses that were left out during winter for cold night roosting and set them back up.  Plenty of food is put out as well and we make some effort to insure the feeders won’t get emptied by larger birds like the Mourning doves, Grackles, European Starlings and Blue Jays by using weight sensitive feeders.  Grackles and Blue Jays manage to work these feeders anyway by bouncing up and down.  But we don’t mind since they can’t really land on the feeder blocking small birds from getting on.

We take our cues from the plants and trees in the garden.  We put oranges out when the cherry trees blossom; that is when the Baltimore Orioles (Icterus galbula) start to show up.  We put sugar syrup out when the Columbine starts to bloom.  That’s when Ruby-throated Hummingbirds reach us from the south.

Arriving on the same schedule are the tree Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor). They’re looking for nesting boxes now.  This year is much harder for them since the Eastern Bluebird beat them to nesting, having eggs now, get very territorial.  They don’t want any neighbors, even when the closest box is 20 feet away the male Bluebird still chases any bird who has the temerity to stray too close.  Also House Sparrows that try to nest in every box in the yard.  It seems like an uphill battle for the Swallows but they still try and we do our best chasing the Sparrows to give them an edge.

A pair of Tree Swallows checking one of the nest boxes.  They have not yet picked one.

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) has also arrived.  Generally we only see the male at this time of year.  Some years they will stay through the season but some years they just pass through.

A male Rose-breasted Grosbeak enjoy chipped sunflower seeds and peanuts
A male Baltimore Oriole enjoying oranges

I know that the Baltimore Orioles are here, aside from the cherry tree cue, we can hear them.  They haven’t come down for the oranges yet.  Above is an image captured last year.

 

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