Good Year For Bluebirds

Starting Their Second Brood

I think the Bluebirds are getting more comfortable with our garden now.  They no longer leave us during winter.  We provide roosting boxes, food and water in heated birdbaths when nothing much is around in winter and we help with guarding their nesting box during their breeding season.  Since they have become our resident birds, they have started their nesting early.  Last year they had two broods and this year they have already started a second brood while still feeding their chicks from the first brood.

They started the first brood in April. Once the female lays eggs, we start to monitor the nest box weekly to make sure they are fine.  Four out of five eggs hatched with the 1st brood.

May 7th – not much feathering and eyes still closed
May 14th – They are much bigger and have feathers. This was our last photo because we don’t want them to fledge too early

We stopped checking their nest box when the chicks have full feathers.  If they fledge too early, out of concern for their own safety, they could become other birds food.  So we don’t want to stress them with visits.

May 30th – The female tends to one of the chicks in between building a new nest
A couple taking a break from feeding the chicks and building a new nest
June 4th – The first egg in a new nest-second brood
Two of the babies from the first brood perching on top of new nest box
Male keeps his eyes on his chicks and the new nest too

The second nest is right by our vegetable garden and the green pole is only a couple of feet from the front of the nest box.  Hopefully there will be another three or more chicks from the second brood.

Eastern Bluebird

The First Family To Settle

Spring is a very active season for birds.  I can tell that spring is really coming when the male American Goldfinches shed their winter coats and the male Cardinals are no longer willing to eat together.  The same thing goes for the Eastern Bluebirds which no longer flock together like they do in winter.  There is also their singing.

The first pair of birds that took up residence in our garden this year is the Eastern Bluebird.  After picking and choosing among several nest boxes in the yard, they ended up at the same one the bluebirds nested in last year.  I’m not sure that it’s the same pair though, since a flock of them stayed with us this winter.

Male Eastern Bluebird staying on top of the house they picked
The female keeps her eyes on it from the tree above
Their new home

Once the female has started to lay eggs, the male become very territorial.  A Tree Swallow who just migrated back, checked the nest box for availability and was immediately chased away.  As aggressive as the male bluebird is, he’s no match to the House sparrow.  We have to diligently monitor all the nest boxes in the garden for signs of the House Sparrows.  So far we have been successfully hosted Eastern Bluebirds, Tree Swallows, House Wrens, Chickadees and Tufted Titmouse in our nest boxes by monitoring the House Sparrows attempts.

April 16: three beautiful blue eggs
April 22: five eggs
She rarely leaves the nest now

Hopefully most of the eggs she’s caring for now will make it to adulthood.  We’re happy to see more and more of them each year and to know that they are comfortable enough to stay with us year round.

These are the one’s that use the nest boxes.  The one’s that prefer to build their own nests like the American Robins, Chipping Sparrows and Song Sparrows have already picked their spots in the foliage.  I’ll have to check on the Robins next time I have a chance.  Last I checked, they had just finished building their nest.

We are still waiting for the Grey Catbirds, Baltimore Orioles and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds to come back.  The wait won’t be much longer because the Cherry trees have started to blossom and the Columbine is starting to bud.

 

 

First Family Of The Season

Eastern Bluebird

The weather is still too cold for spring.  Night time temperature a little bit above the freezing point most nights.  Making matters worse, we had an ice storm four days ago.  The birds, on the other hand, seem to know better since they have started to shed their winter down.  This is the time of year I see a lot of fine feathers blowing in the garden or floating in the birdbaths.    The male American Goldfinches have almost completely turned bright yellow by now, their summer color.

Most of our birds have just started to claim territory and are checking available nest boxes.  Some have already paired up with  mates.  The Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis), on the other hand, has already laid eggs.  I thought they had only built their nest since it’s still very cold.  I always monitor our nest boxes in the garden to make sure that there are no House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) nesting there.  Once I saw the female Bluebird leave the nest box, I had to take a peek.

A surprise!

Four little blue eggs
Four little blue eggs

They never left us this past winter anyway.  I think they probably felt comfortable here with food, water and roosting box to take shelter in during winter.  And, plenty of food in spring and summer.

Mom keeps her eggs warm and keeps watch for intruders
Mom keeps her eggs warm and keeps watch for intruders
Dad checking the feeder. He has a full-time job keeping the House Sparrows away from his family
Dad checking the feeder. He has a full-time job keeping the House Sparrows away from his family

I hope they will have two broods this year since they’ve started the first one early.  There really is no such thing as too many Bluebirds.

First Family of the Year

Eastern Bluebirds Have Settled

However bad this last winter was, the Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia Sialis) elected not to leave us for warmer digs down south.  Maybe because we provided everything they needed here: food, water and places to roost inside from the cold wind and snow.  This last winter was the first time that they were really present on an almost daily basis.  Once the weather started to get warmer, they started to seriously look for a place to nest.  From an initial flock, there are only four left now.  They have made their territorial claims.  I don’t know whether the pair that is nesting in one of the nest boxes now is the same pair that nested in there last year.  I was unable to find any information on whether they try to nest at the same place every year as the Tree Swallows do.

Last Sunday, Easter Sunday, I spent all day in the garden.  Aside from doing the usual garden chores I also checked on the new residents.  Who’s just come back, who’s nesting where and also monitoring the House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) at the nest boxes.  The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is still battling his image in the bay window on a daily basis.  A female Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is building her nest in the front Azalea.  Two pairs of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) are taking up residence in two of the nest boxes, one of which is the same as last year.

In the end, to my surprise, I found my favorite Easter eggs.  A pair of Eastern Bluebirds have laid four beautiful blue eggs.  I hope it’s not too cold for them at night (still below 40ºF most night) for them to hatch.  I hope to see them start bringing food in for their young in a little over a week.  And then, start a second brood…

Soon to be a new Mom
Soon to be a new Mom
Soon to be a new Dad
Soon to be a new Dad
Four beautiful blue eggs. Image taken with an iPhone.
Four beautiful blue eggs. Image taken with an iPhone.
She's keeping them warm.
She’s keeping them warm.