Tag Archives: Plumeria

In The Tropic

Colorful Display

It was nice to go from bone-chilling cold to warm and humid weather and be among a variety of very bright, colorful and beautiful tropical flowers.  Now, back to the cold climate and inches of snow on the ground, the longing for the site and the scent still lingers.  Working on photographs I took during the trip helps a little.  Here are a few to share with you.

Sala flower, aside from it’s beauty, it’s also fragrant

Sala (Couroupita guianensis) or Cannonball tree has quiet beautiful flowers that look like anemone.  The flower has very sweet fragrant. I wish I could grow it here.

As much as I don’t really like Bougainvillea, I have to accept that the color combination of this plant at the place we stayed, is really something to be seen.

Bougainvillea along the driveway of the resort where we stayed
More Bougainvillea
Pink water lily
Two tone water lily

They look fake but they aren’t.  Waterlilies comes in so many shades and colors here, some are even fragrant. Talking about fragrant tropical flowers, Plumeria is one of my favorites.  It also comes in a variety of colors but I love the nuances in the white variety the most.  The one below is from the rows that grow in front of the resort we stayed at, between us and the beach.

White Plumeria

 

Flower Offering

For Peace Of Mind

I prefer to make an offering in what ever method is considered respectable in whatever country I visit; Buddha, Stupa, Bodhi Tree, River, Ganesh, Shiva Lingam, to name a few.  I don’t see any harm in making an offering since the act exists in all cultures and can be traced back as far as ancient Egypt.  Whether I believe this ritual will bring me anything is another story.  My parents taught me that ‘Even if you don’t believe, don’t insult’ so respecting what others believe has always been my principle policy.

Lotus, Jasmine, Marigold, Plumeria and Orchid seem to be common offering flowers in Asia.  The flowers in general represent prosperity and abundance.  The water represents peace and abundance.  Whether prosperity and abundance materialize or not is anyone’s guess, but watching lotus offerings floating slowly down the stream, circling one another and stopping at the edge of the reflecting pool was very peaceful.

Offering flowers: Plumeria among orchids and chrysthemum
Offering flowers: Plumeria among orchids and chrysanthemums
Pink and white lotus with some petals folded
Pink and white lotus with some petals folded
Lotus grouped randomly, floating down stream
Lotus grouped randomly, floating down stream
White lotus floating together
White lotus floating together
Pink lotus at the edge of the reflecting pool
Pink lotus at the edge of the reflecting pool
Floating White lotus
Floating White lotus
White lotus at the edge of the reflecting pool
White lotus at the edge of the reflecting pool

 

 

Back From The Tropics

With the Memory of Colorful Flowers

I have taken leave to the other side of the world for a couple of weeks.  Though I didn’t have much time to look around as I usually do, still common tropical flowers were the cheerful sight to be seen.  Nothing much in North America but bare branches and snow.  So, sharing some colorful images of these common tropical flowers wouldn’t hurt.

Plumeria
Plumeria

Plumeria (Plumeria obtusa) flower has a very soothing fragrance.  This plant in the photo is around two stories high but Plumeria can be grown in a pot and kept short and tidy.

Bougainvillea
Bougainvillea
Bougainvillea
Bougainvillea

Paper Flower (Bougainvillea) is another common tropical flower that can take negligence and drought in stride.  It comes in many colors, from white, bright pink, orange, yellow, red… It blooms throughout the year and is great for trellises or climbing on a fence.

Desert rose
Desert rose

Desert Rose (Adenium obesum) is another flower that does well in heat and negligence. It comes in both single and double petals as well as in a variety of colors.  I attempted to grow it here once, but too much pampering with food and water, I killed it.  I guess they call it ‘Desert Rose’ for a reason.

Paraguay Jasmine
Paraguay Jasmine

The flower of Paraguay Jasmine (Brunfelsia australis) aka Yesterday-today-and-tomorrow is slightly fragrant.  The flower first opens up in violet then fades to pale pink and white at the end.

Wild Petunia
Wild Petunia

This lovely violet flower-Wild Petunia (Ruellia tuberosa) is classified as a weed with herbal properties.  Since people tolerate them because of their beautiful color, they can be seen along side local roads and highways.

I’m not advocating growing non-native plants but most plants above can be grown in a pot in USDA Zone 3-8 or in the ground in Zone 9-11.