They’re Back

…Time For Us To Play Host Again

Most of the birds that migrate south during winter have come back. The Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) came back before everyone else. They swooped around looking for their old houses that I had removed for the winter. They checked out the Bluebirds nest box and were chased off by the occupants.  As soon as I put the box back up where it was used by them last year, they took ownership with in minutes.  Another pair took one nest box in the front but was harassed relentlessly by the House sparrows.  I hope that it doesn’t deter the Swallows from staying with us.

A Tree Swallow sunbathing
A Tree Swallow sunbathing
A couple resting in front of their nest box
A couple resting in front of their nest box

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) also came back to the feeder.  I have seen just the males, no females in sight yet.  Chipping Sparrows (Spizella passerine), Gray Catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis), House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) are back as well.  The Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) settled for the suet as many of the fruit trees around here haven’t blossom yet.

A male Baltimore Oriole at the suet
A male Baltimore Oriole at the suet
A male Rose-breasted Grosbeak packing up on seeds
A male Rose-breasted Grosbeak packing up on seeds
Gray Catbird
Gray Catbird
Male Ruby-throated Hummingbird defending his feeder
Male Ruby-throated Hummingbird defending his feeder
Male Yellow Warbler looking for insects in rose bush
Male Yellow Warbler looking for insects in rose bush

I haven’t seen the White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys), Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) yet this year.  But the spring is still young and very cold.  Hopefully they’ll filter in with the warmth.

5 thoughts on “They’re Back

    1. Thank you. I hope they are happy here so they’ll be back year after year. I’m reading ‘Homing Instinct’ by Bernd Heinrich now to learn more about the animal migration. I’m fascinated by how the Tree Swallows know exactly where their old nest boxes are.

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