Winter Birds

The weather forecast for a foot of snow last Sunday didn’t become reality however the temperature has dropped down to 0 Fahrenheit plus windchill factor of -20 Fahrenheit. Icy rain water from Sunday turned into solid ice on all surfaces. Our driveway, from which we cleared wet snow & slush off and salted, still became skating rink. Wherever I look there is either frozen snow or ice. Conditions like this are difficult for non-migrating birds.

We have a symbiotic relationship with the birds in our garden. Aside from serenading us with their beautiful songs, they help rid us of insects during growing season. We in turn provide food, water and shelter for them in winter. We left brush piles and bird boxes up for them to take refuge in. Weather conditions like this weekend are crucial for us in expressing our gratitude so there will be more of them visiting our garden next year.

We leave bird boxes up in winter for the birds to roost. We take them down in early spring, clean and refurbish, if needed, then put them back up for new sets of bird to nest and raise their young.

Food, water and shelter are three necessary things for non-migrating birds in winter. Most birds can easily find shelter on their own but having a shelter close to their food source makes life easier especially when it’s frigid outside. But when there is deep snow or ice sheets covering everything, it doesn’t matter how luxurious a shelter is. If there’s no food, birds will move on. They also learn where reliable food sources are and tend to stay close by.

We leave one weight sensitive feeder in the garden but both feeding ports of this bird feeder were frozen shut this weekend

We feed them more in winter: two double suet feeders, one tray feeder (only when we are home to monitor it), and two hanging feeders. We fill them with mixed of shelled sunflower seeds, safflower seeds, peanuts, chipped-sunflower seeds, chipped-peanut, and dried-berries. We reduce to one feeder and one suet in late spring when there is plenty of fresh food around.

Heated birdbaths are very crucial and a magnet for winter birds. We place seven birdbaths in the garden during warm weather which are emptied and clean every five days. This is the best way to prevent mosquito larvae to reach maturity. We leave only two heated ones out in winter. Both of them are in the close proximity of the house so we can clean them regularly. Mosquitos still lay eggs in winter, providing warm water. Yes, to my surprise too, I found mosquito larvae in our heated birdbath in winter.

A Titmouse enjoy warm water amidst snow and ice ..Nice hairdo
American Goldfinch waiting for his turn at the feeder
Black-capped Chickadee puffed up against the wind

As our relationship goes, we learn to read each others sign language. When the feeder is empty or they have difficulty getting seeds out of it, we will see birds line up on the pool fence facing the house. It’s as though they’re saying ‘What’s wrong with you people? Don’t you know the feeder’s empty?’ When we fill the feeder, they will perch close by, watching us doing our job, and come down as soon as we close the lid.

Now is when we care for them, and they never fail to reciprocate when growing season begins.

6 thoughts on “Winter Birds

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    1. Thank you. Not that often that we have ice everywhere so I braved the frigid cold for a few minutes. All my fingers, with gloves on, were numb afterward. But for a few days we are all living in the land of the ‘glass’ trees.

    1. They take 4-5 days to go through two suets, providing that there are no European Starlings around. With a flock of Starlings, the suets can be gone within two days. For the seed feeders, it usually takes them a couple of days to go through each one. We remove feeders from under the patio roof when we are not home otherwise squirrels, House sparrows and Starlings will finish them in a day. We only leave the ones covered with a squirrel guard and a weight sensitive bar out for smaller birds.
      I think it will probably take the birds some time to find your feeders, especially if there is no one around to put up feeders regularly. Once they find it and the feeder is always there, they will come regularly. They do remember, but they have to find it first.

      Have fun winter bird watching!

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