Earth Day

With Respect and Gratitude 

The Earth gives us sanctuary and sustains us in all things.  Aside from being a provider, she is also a designer, inventor and teacher among many other things. She is kind but can never be tamed.  That last is quite likely what saves us all from ourselves in the end.

Here’s some of the great beauty she gives us….

Crocus, after hiding below the surface of the earth for most of the year, tells me that spring is finally here
Primrose
Hellebore
Sand cherry blooms much earlier than other cherries in our garden, with a lovely honey fragrance
Columbine catching a rain drop

Thank you, Mother Earth

With Respect and gratitude

Signs Of Spring’s Arrival

New Life Cycle

It’s been only three months when I last saw flowers in our garden but it seems a very long time ago.  The longing get worse when I see flowers in other bloggers gardens that are still blooming or spring flowers that have already come up.  Wishing that we lived in a warmer climate usually grips us at this time of year.  But gardening and beekeeping in extreme weather is a fun challenge and keeps me on my toes.  Good planning and timing is pretty crucial.  I have never been obsessed with checking weather this much in my life.  So many people I know wake up in the morning and check Facebook, Twitter, Email, even Snapchat, …I check the weather.

Finally, winter has released her grip in my neighborhood.  It has been warmer most days now: above 30°F and some days above 50°F. Early spring plants are responding accordingly.

Some Snowdrops just came up
Some Snowdrops just came up
Some have opened
Some have opened
Columbine
Columbine
Tulips
Tulips

And, my longing turns to itchiness.  Itching to get my hands in the dirt, get my arms scratched by the rose bushes, get bitten by insects, get natural vitamin D and end my day with aches and pain BUT happy and fulfilled.

 

Spring

Colors And Scents Are Back

Summer will be here in two weeks and I can feel the heat in the air already.   One day the temperature was hovering below 50º F and I had to wear a sweatshirt in the garden.  The plants just stalled in their growth.  The next day it hit 80º F and even wearing just a t-shirt it was too hot, but plants were shooting up all over the place.   As much as there is an endless list of things to do at this time of year and never enough hours in the day, I still love this time of year the most.  Life has renewed itself in the garden.  There are some disappointments of course here and there.  The Wisteria has only  a few flowers, not a lovely waterfall of flowers as it did in years past.  Clematis Montana and Lilac, both the common one and ‘Miss Kim’ blossomed less than usual.   The Hydrangea has taken its time to sprout, coming up from the base so I don’t expect any flowers this year and I don’t see any new buds on the old branches yet either.  They’re probably still struggling to shrug of winter.

Even with less flowers so far this year there’s still plenty of color and scent in the garden.  The Columbine has never ceased to amaze me.  This year there are more and more new colors and forms that I know I didn’t plant.  Since I let birds and bees do the pollination, it’s always a surprise.  It’s also a good year for irises.

Watering the vegetables a in the morning is a lovely time to be in the garden, with lovely scent wafting in the air and birds singing.   This is the time of year that no matter how late I get home, I make it a point to go out into the garden and breath in the perfumed air while listening to the crickets and peepers performing their nocturne.

Azalea in early spring
Azalea in early spring
Iris and wild phlox
Iris and wild phlox
Spring
Woodland phlox and Columbine
Iris, Daisy, Geranium, Oriental poppy 'Royal Wedding' and Rosa Rugosa 'Ms Doreen Pike' with a granite birdbath in the background
Iris, Daisy, Geranium, Oriental poppy ‘Royal Wedding’ and Rosa Rugosa ‘Ms Doreen Pike’ with a granite birdbath in the background
False Indigo, Columbine and Daisy
False Indigo, Columbine and Daisy

 

Spring

Spring Is Finally Here

Came back from vacation with hope to see some green and a little more warmth than when we left, but didn’t expect the temperature to be just like the tropics where we vacationed.   It has been in the 70s in the last couple of days and the plants love it.  There wasn’t much of anything above ground when we left, but now everything is sprouting up all over the garden.  Garlic I put in last October has come up pretty nicely.  Hellebores perk up in the morning only to wilt a little under the afternoon sun.  Daffodils, Dutch Iris, Hyacinth and Hellebores are either blooming or just about to unfurl their petals.

I spent hours on my day off pruning and training the roses and haven’t finished yet.  This is a time consuming task as well as a time constraint.  If I don’t do it now when the roses are just starting to push out their little buds, it will be a lot harder to do when they have leafed out fully.  Deer have done a lot of damage to the tips of plants that came up early, including Irises.  Who said deer wont eat Iris?  But the worst damage to our garden is caused by squirrels that dig up the tulips bulbs, eat them and leave us the leaves to rub into our wounds.

Aside from the annoying squirrel problems, I’m glad to see color in the garden and the aerial show from our avian friends again.

The first Daffodil that opened up
The first Daffodil that opened up
Hellebore in deep maroon
Hellebore in deep maroon
Freckled hellebore
Freckled hellebore
Scilla alba produces white flowers instead of blue
Scilla alba produces white flowers instead of blue
Scilla in blue and white
Scilla in blue and white
Columbine captures a dew drop in the morning
Columbine captures a dew drop in the morning

Spring Weather, Finally

A Cold, Wet Day

It was normal spring weather today, rainy and chilly as spring should be.  After an unreasonably hot March,  we finally have spring-like weather back.  It’s been raining or drizzling on and off all day.  I decided to roll the row cover back over the vegetable seedlings, though I knew they’d be able to deal with 40 degree temperatures. Howevert the cold does slow their growth.  I want my salad sooner.

There was a brief period today when I could duck out with the camera without ruining it.  Something about the silvery, shimmering drops of water that hang on to leaves and flower petals that is very soothing, very meditating.  Nature stages them, I just took the photographs.

Beauty derived of a wet and cold spring day.

Pearl on a Peony
On a white Bleeding heart leaf
On Columbine leaves
On a Daffodil flower, just about to open
On Anemone
Clinging to a Bleeding heart leaf.
On Helleborus
Little pearls on Columbine leaves