Rose Companions

Enhanced Beauty

I want our garden to resemble a natural environment as much as possible but the roses don’t seem to quite fit.  I try to incorporate roses in the garden anyway.  I love roses and I think any garden without roses is not a complete garden.  Any readers who don’t like roses and think that they are a pain to take care of, please do not take offense.  It’s just my personal take on it.

There are periods, before the roses bloom in late spring and in between blooming (for the re-bloomers) when there are nothing to see but green leaves.  I need plants to give some color to the trellises and the area adjacent to the rose bushes.  There are a few plants I found that work well for our garden and make the garden look more natural.

The first choice, as recommended by many professional gardeners, is Clematis.  They intertwine with rose branches and flower here and there between them.  For mid-spring, Clematis ‘Crystal Fountain’ is really lovely.

Clematis ‘Crystal Fountain’ blooming right next to the Rosa Rugosa ‘Foxi’ and Paul’s Himalayan Musk on the trellis, that was still budding
Clematis ‘Betty Corning’ takes the trellis next to the Rose ‘Eden’. It blooms for months if deadhead. It’s also lightly fragrant.
Clematis ‘Belle of Woking’ with Rose ‘Knockout’ and peony
White peony with Rose ‘Knockout’

Peony is another good companion for roses. Unfortunately, I’ve forgotten the name of the white one above.  But the flowers large and quite fragrant.

This peony came with the house so I don’t know the name. I just divided them and tucked them here and there.
Iris is also a good rose companion. This one is right next to the Rose ‘Jewel Topaz’ which is still budding.

A new wave of rose buds have started to emerge now, not as profuse as in late spring.  I’ll keep seeking rose companions and in the meantime, the echinacea and garden phlox are in full bloom.

 

 

Too Cold To Be Outside

A Good Time For Planning: Flowers For Pollinators I

Snow came down two days ago accumulating just three inches.  Today the garden is still covered with snow and the temperature dropped down to just above 10°F.  It’s a perfect winter day for bird watching through the patio door.  Since the ground is covered with snow and the sources of water around here have turned to ice, they congregate around our feeders and heated birdbaths.  It’s also a good day to start planning for the next growing season.

The plant catalogs have been piling up. I have picked out a couple of new vegetables I want to try and am now looking for flowers that bees and butterflies will like. A new Cosmos ‘Cupcake’ looks very tempting. I have already put 200 crocus in this autumn. If they haven’t all been dug up by the squirrels and chipmunks they should blossom when spring arrives.  Any new plants I choose I make sure will benefit all pollinators, not just honeybees.  If I have to pick and choose however, flowers for the bees will come first.

Here are some plants that work for our pollinator garden and I start with flowers:

Alyssum comes in white, pink and purple. It blooms until frost and has honey scent
Alyssum comes in white, pink and purple. It blooms until frost and has a honey scent.  It’s great for ground cover too.  The white variety self sows very well
Honeybee seems to like this Aster more than the lavender color
Honeybees seem to like this Aster more than the lavender color.  It’s a good late season food source for pollinators.
Summersweet
Summersweet has a perfect name; its fragrance is really sweet. I grow both the pink and white varieties. But it can be a problem in the garden as it produces a lot of suckers.
Sunflower is also everyone favorite, birds included.
Sunflower is also everyone’s favorite, birds included. I was able to grow sunflowers again last year after I put the deer net up.  Prior to last year, all flowers, in fact everything, became deer food.  Sunflowers are fun to grow as there are many colors and different heights to choose from.  The Maximillian’s sunflower below will also brighten up late summer in the garden
Maximillian's sunflower 'Santa Fe' is a perennial that can grow over 6 feet tall and produce plenty of flowers on each stem
Maximillian’s sunflower ‘Santa Fe’ is a perennial that can grow over 6 feet tall and produce plenty of flowers on each stem.
Echinacea is a must for pollinators garden
Echinacea is a must for a pollinators garden.  There are a variety of colors to choose from: pink, white, yellow, orange.  The native purple (dark pink actually) readily self sows.  I propagate other colors by digging them up and separating them after a couple of years.
Butterfly Bush
Butterfly Bush (Buddleia davidii)has a strong fragrance and easily self sows.  I pick off spent flowers before they set seeds which encourages the plant to produce more flowers and no seedlings that I will have to pull next season.
This iris is a re-blooming variety
This iris is a re-blooming variety and fragrant.  I planted more bearded iris last autumn and look forward to seeing them bloom this spring.
Water Jasmine
Water Jasmine is a tropical flower with a mild, soothing fragrance.  In it’s native tropics, it’ll bloom year round but in a cold climate it blooms heavily in summer.  Bees and moths love it. The honeybee in the photo above is covered with hollyhock pollen .

These are just some of the flowers I managed to photograph with honeybees on them.  There are many more flowers that they like- crocus, snowdrop, Black-eyed Susan.  Next post will be on herbs and vegetables that I allow to flower, both as a pollinators food source and as the next season’s seeds.

 

 

 

Spring

Colors And Scents Are Back

Summer will be here in two weeks and I can feel the heat in the air already.   One day the temperature was hovering below 50º F and I had to wear a sweatshirt in the garden.  The plants just stalled in their growth.  The next day it hit 80º F and even wearing just a t-shirt it was too hot, but plants were shooting up all over the place.   As much as there is an endless list of things to do at this time of year and never enough hours in the day, I still love this time of year the most.  Life has renewed itself in the garden.  There are some disappointments of course here and there.  The Wisteria has only  a few flowers, not a lovely waterfall of flowers as it did in years past.  Clematis Montana and Lilac, both the common one and ‘Miss Kim’ blossomed less than usual.   The Hydrangea has taken its time to sprout, coming up from the base so I don’t expect any flowers this year and I don’t see any new buds on the old branches yet either.  They’re probably still struggling to shrug of winter.

Even with less flowers so far this year there’s still plenty of color and scent in the garden.  The Columbine has never ceased to amaze me.  This year there are more and more new colors and forms that I know I didn’t plant.  Since I let birds and bees do the pollination, it’s always a surprise.  It’s also a good year for irises.

Watering the vegetables a in the morning is a lovely time to be in the garden, with lovely scent wafting in the air and birds singing.   This is the time of year that no matter how late I get home, I make it a point to go out into the garden and breath in the perfumed air while listening to the crickets and peepers performing their nocturne.

Azalea in early spring
Azalea in early spring
Iris and wild phlox
Iris and wild phlox
Spring
Woodland phlox and Columbine
Iris, Daisy, Geranium, Oriental poppy 'Royal Wedding' and Rosa Rugosa 'Ms Doreen Pike' with a granite birdbath in the background
Iris, Daisy, Geranium, Oriental poppy ‘Royal Wedding’ and Rosa Rugosa ‘Ms Doreen Pike’ with a granite birdbath in the background
False Indigo, Columbine and Daisy
False Indigo, Columbine and Daisy

 

First Snow Fall Of The Season

Not Much But Still Beautiful

I woke up this morning to see snow falling outside.  The temperature is cold with no wind so the snow stayed on the leaves and on the ground.  Lucky that I’ve gotten everything I needed done in the garden before the weather got cold and snow fell.  We insulated our beehives only last week, good for us and the honeybees.  We also put up a cold frame for the first time this year and getting it in last weekend.  We weren’t looking forward to hammering poles into frozen ground!  We can now grow winter vegetables like Kale, Swiss chard and Arugula in there. I’m not sure how well this will work but I want to try growing hardier vegetables year round if I can.

Anyway the sight of snow on the ground, trees, leaves and flowers is a reminder of the omnipresence of beauty year ’round.

Snow on Japanese maple
Snow on Japanese maple
A flower bud of re-blooming iris that will not have a chance to blossom.
A flower bud of re-blooming iris that will not have a chance to blossom.
Ivy on a wild cherry tree looks becoming frosted with snow
Ivy on a wild cherry tree looks becoming frosted with snow

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