Tag Archives: Rose ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk’

First Day Of Summer

Yes, Looks Very Much Like Summer

Today is the official first day of summer and the garden looks very much like summer.  The weather is also perfect..cool, sunny, with a little breeze.  Juvenile birds tag along with their parents and wait to be fed on branches near by.  The chicks from the second family of Tree Swallows learn to fly by gliding around the garden.

Over all it’s a great day to welcome summer.

Paul's Himalayan Musk rose has never failed to bloom profusely
Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose has never failed to bloom profusely
Buttercup
Buttercup
Clematis 'Betty Corning' and Buttercup
Clematis ‘Betty Corning’ and Buttercup
Feverfew, Agastache and Columbine
Feverfew, Agastache and Columbine
Milkweed
Milkweed
'Heritage' rose and columbine
‘Heritage’ rose and columbine
Coreopsis and Campanula
Coreopsis and Campanula

 

Spring Recap

An End And A Beginning

Spring has come and gone and somewhat unevenly too.  The gap between day and night temperatures was very wide for some time, then a continuously pouring rain for several days.  During the 70 to 85 degrees days, the plants shot up,  leaves peeking out and flowers budding only to be knocked back by very cold nights.  Vegetables, except for the tomatoes and chili peppers, love this kind of weather but the roses had their blooms battered and washed off and their leaves have developed black spots.  I’m not really complaining since our house is still standing and our garden remains intact.  Mother nature is still kind to us.

Now summer is officially here but the rain continues.  In the next five days the prediction is for heavy storms or scattered thunder storms. In the meantime the summer flowers and insects are taking their turn while spring has faded slowly away.  This is how spring has unfolded in our garden so far.

Oriental poppy among Sea foam and Columbine
Oriental poppy among Sea foam and Columbine
A lone Clematis 'Crystal Fountain' blooms in the middle of Paul's Himalayan Musk rose
A lone Clematis ‘Crystal Fountain’ blooms in the middle of Paul’s Himalayan Musk rose
Multiple Hover flys on the Alyssum
Multiple Hover flys on the Alyssum
This pink Azalea still blooms after the rest of our Azaleas have gone
This pink Azalea still blooms after the rest of our Azaleas have gone

Rose This Spring: Climbing and Rambling

Early Bloomers

Aside from the Rugosa roses that bloom early, some of our climbing and rambling roses are also blooming.  The sad part is most of them bloom only once a year.  All of the ‘once blooming’ roses in the garden are ones that I planted very early on when I had no idea that some of the roses in this climate bloom only once a year (I grew up in the subtropics where they bloom all year round).  I select more carefully now.

The once blooming rambling rose that’s worth growing is the ‘Paul’s Himalayan Musk.’  When it’s in full bloom, aside from a sea of small pink flowers, the honey scent is lovely.  It can grow around five to six feet a season and can grow more than thirty feet in length.  This rose and it’s cousin – Himalayan Alba- are the ones that give me grief every spring.  Pruning rambling rose is not an easy task.  I gave both of them a crew cut this spring and they have already filled up the empty spaces.

Both of us attempted to dig out the Blaze many times because all of the leaves drop off after it finishes blooming, mostly from black spots and in some years, mildew as well.  But it manages to change our mind every spring when its branches are cover with bright red flowers.  It is another of the roses that I originally planted.  One of these days, either I figure out how to deal with the black spots or I’ll just dig it out and plant a different rose that will bloom all season.  It’s a heart wrenching decision.

Zephirine Drouhin is an Old Garden climbing rose that will bloom throughout the season and is highly fragrant as well.  The deer ate most of its new shoots last year but this year I managed to discourage them so it bloomed profusely in gratitude.

We grow climbing and rambling roses to cover the unsightly pool fence.  This is where Paul's Himalayan Musk and Blaze meet.
We grow climbing and rambling roses to cover the unsightly pool fence. This is where Paul’s Himalayan Musk and Blaze meet.
Blaze has been loading its branches with bright red flowers every late spring but its leaves drop afterward, caused by black spots.  How can we dig it up when it manages to do this every spring.
Blaze has been loading its branches with bright red flowers every late spring but its leaves drop afterward, caused by black spots. How can we dig it up when it manages to do this every spring.
Blaze, close up
Blaze, close up
Paul's Himalayan Musk covers one side of the fence
Paul’s Himalayan Musk covers one side of the fence
Loaded with small pink flowers having a honey scent
Loaded with small pink flowers having a honey scent
Paul's Himalayan Musk, close up. Various stages of flower-from pink when first blooming to almost white before the petals drop
Paul’s Himalayan Musk, close up. Various stages of flower-from pink when first blooming to almost white before the petals drop
Zephirine Drouhin is a re-blooming climbing rose with very strong fragrance
Zephirine Drouhin is a re-blooming climbing rose with very strong fragrance
Zephirine Drouhin with Knockout rose in the background
Zephirine Drouhin with Knockout rose in the background